Garden Worms vs Composting Worms

Garden worms and composting worms are two totally different species. Composting worms (aka red wigglers) will die if placed in soil. Do NOT put Composting Worms in your garden.

Gardens need earthworms (like nightcrawlers) to aerate the soil and breakdown some dead organic matter. This type of worm can survive winter freezes and summer heat waves. For in-soil burrowing you want an Anecic species.

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Worm Life Cycle

Cocoons may contain 3 to as many as 9 baby wigglers. 3 to 4 is most common. The cocoons are tiny, like a small grape pip. They are oblong like a lemon and initially light yellow and deepen to maroon as the eggs develop. Under ideal conditions the tiny whitish babies (1/4th of an inch) will emerge in 21 to 28 days.Adult can produce 3 to 4 cocoons each week.

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Worm Glossary

Alabama/Georgia Jumpers (Amynthus Gracilus) - The jumper worm is native to Asia. It is an invasive species in the US, especially deciduous forests. Unfortunately it now populates large sections of North America. They can outcompete our native worms, but they are not cold tolerant so they can die off in our winters.

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